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Gone International: mobility works

Report
2 March 2017

This report by Universities UK International compares the academic attainment and employment outcomes of mobile and non-mobile first degree undergraduate students who completed their studies at the end of the 2014–15 academic year.

It provides the third annual national outline of who goes abroad, and considers what currently available data can tell us about the outcomes of international experience as part of a UK undergraduate programme. The findings in this report also aim to inform discussions within the sector about increasing participation of underrepresented groups in outward mobility opportunities, by identifying specific outcomes for these groups.

 

Key findings:

  • There is a correlation between outward mobility and improved academic and employment outcomes. Graduates who were mobile during their degree were less likely to be unemployed (3.7% compared to 4.9%), and more likely to have earned a first class or upper second class degree (80.1% compared to 73.6%) and be in further study (15% compared to 14%). Those in work were more likely to be in a graduate level job (76.4% compared to 69.9%) and earn 5% more than their non-mobile peers.
  • The difference in outcomes between mobile and non-mobile students are particularly pronounced for disadvantaged and black and minority ethnic students, who are underrepresented in mobility. On average, graduates from more disadvantaged backgrounds who were mobile during their degree earned 6.1% more, and those in work were more likely to be in a graduate level job (80.2% compared to 74.7%) than their non-mobile peers. Black graduates who were mobile were 41% less likely to be unemployed (4.6% compared to 7.8%) than their non-mobile peers. Asian graduates who were mobile earned on average 8% more and were 42% less likely to be unemployed (7.7% compared to 4.5%) than their non-mobile peers.

Read the press release here.

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