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Managing meningococcal disease (septicaemia or meningitis) in higher education institutions

Universities and colleges are increasingly aware that cases of meningococcal disease cause great stress on campuses.

Students are at risk. Their living arrangements and lifestyles often pose particular problems in public health management.

This publication summarises the issues facing students, staff, universities and colleges and their associated health services and health protection units. It provides advice on drawing up plans for universities and health protection units with recommended action before and after a case occurs.

The guidelines propose that each higher education institution ensures that it has a management protocol for dealing with such cases. In particular, such policies should ensure that there are:

  • good channels of communication with students; staff and the public;e
  • effective support arrangements for students
  • strong links to health protection units and local GPs; and
  • direct access to appropriate advice on the management of meningococcal disease.
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