Home > News and blog > Confirmation of EU students' fees in England post-Brexit

Confirmation of EU students' fees in England post-Brexit

​Universities UK has responded to the announcement from the Department of Education that EU students starting courses next year (2019-20) in England will remain eligible to receive government-backed loans to cover their tuition fee for the duration of their courses.


Education Secretary for England Damian Hinds confirmed also that the maximum tuition fees that universities in England will be able to charge will be frozen for the second year running.

Alistair Jarvis, Chief Executive of Universities UK, said: "This announcement on fees and financial support provides much needed clarity for EU students and for universities." 

"Students from EU countries can now apply for places on undergraduate courses starting in autumn 2019 with the confidence that they will not have to pay up-front tuition fees and will remain eligible to receive government-backed loans to cover their tuition fee for the duration of their courses. This announcement means that EU students commencing courses in autumn 2019 will continue to pay the same tuition fees as UK students for the full duration of their courses."

"EU students make an important contribution to our universities, enriching our campuses culturally and academically." 

"Another year of freezing tuition fee levels for English students will put additional pressures on university finances. Universities continue to work hard to seek efficiencies and deliver value for money for students."

 

Notes

  1. For more information on the announcement, see the DfE news item Further financial support for UK and EU students

  2. In England there are more than 65,000 EU students studying at first-degree, undergraduate level. Across the UK and at all levels of study, there are a total of 134,835 students from other EU countries in the UK and demand has remained strong in recent years.

  1. Universities UK has been calling for this confirmation since the start of 2018 and says. It warned last month that the UK could see a drop in EU students unless there urgent clarity about the fee status of EU students starting courses next year (2019-20) was provided.

  1. Ahead of the EU leaders summit in March this year, Universities UK published a priorities statement on Brexit. It called for clarity on a number of areas affecting universities, including the issue of 2019-20 EU students' status.


Key Contacts

Jo Hindle

Jo Hindle

Head of Media
Universities UK

Luke Lambert

Luke Lambert

Press and Social Media Officer
Universities UK

Clara Plackett

Clara Plackett

Senior Press and Social Media Officer
Universities UK

Blog

Brexit day is here; but where next for the UK's immigration system?

31 January 2020
On the day that the UK leaves the European Union, UUK's Karmjit Kaur sets out what immigration reforms are needed to ensure the system is fit for purpose.

General election 2019: what the parties say on higher education

27 November 2019
UUK's Karmjit Kaur takes a look at the policy commitments on higher education in party manifestos ahead of the general election.

News

​Time is running out to save Erasmus+: Losing study abroad scheme would blow a hole in UK economic prospects

9 March 2020
More than 17,000 UK university students are hoping that the UK Government can negotiate continued involvement in Erasmus+ in its trade discussions with the European Union so they can develop important and necessary skills overseas next year.

Universities UK response to UK-EU trade negotiations proposals

27 February 2020
​Today (Thursday 27 February), UK Government has set out its position for UK-EU negotiations over future trade agreements, with student mobility and research programmes an important part of the discussions.