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Where student fees go

Report
10 September 2013

Report page
In the past few years, the way English universities are funded to teach full-time UK and EU undergraduate students has shifted rapidly, from significant dependence on government funding to significant dependence on income from student fees.

As a result, universities are often asked to explain how they are using the income from variable fees.

Drawing on examples from universities across England, this report illustrates the way in which universities are changing in response to this shift. Case studies illustrate how universities are investing in financial aid, improving teaching, creating new facilities to support students as they learn, and investing heavily in measures to help graduates secure good jobs. 

The examples provide a snapshot of the way tuition fees are starting to change universities. Following cuts in direct public funding, this income is essential to ensure students get a truly world-class higher education.

The team

Rosalind Lowe

Rosalind Lowe

Policy Researcher
Universities UK

Jovan Luzajic

Jovan Luzajic

Senior Policy Analyst
Universities UK

Julie Tam

Julie Tam

Assistant Director of Policy
Universities UK

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