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Proposals for national arrangements for the use of academic credit in higher education in England

Report
13 December 2006

'Credit’ has an increasingly important role to play in recording student achievement and also for providing support for students and their progression both into and within the education system.

It is a key tool for promoting lifelong learning.

Credit can serve a number of purposes but is fundamentally a tool for assessing the equivalence of learning achieved by an individual. Credit is usually defined by a specific number of credit points, representing how much learning an individual has done to achieve a qualification. The level at which credit points are awarded is also important.

Credit points and level or qualification descriptors are often part of, or linked to, local, regional or national frameworks. A credit framework is a means of setting down the recommended overall credit requirements for specific qualifications. Framework or level descriptors outline the general outcomes of learning expected at a given level.

In 2004, the first Burgess Report – The Report of the Measuring and Recording Student Achievement Scoping Group – called for the adoption of a common higher education credit system/framework in England, Wales and Northern Ireland. A Measuring and Recording Student Achievement Steering Group was established in February 2005 to consider and consult on practical proposals for the implementation of the Scoping Group’s recommendations. This report contains the proposals which are the outcome of those deliberations.