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Guidance on the prevention and management of meningococcal meningitis and septicaemia in higher education institutions

Students in full time higher education are at higher risk of meningococcal disease (meningitis and septicaemia) than their peers. 

Their living arrangements and lifestyles pose particular challenges in disease prevention and management. Universities and colleges are aware of these risks and challenges as well as the stress to students and staff on campuses caused by cases of the disease.​

This publication summarises the issues facing students, staff, universities and colleges and their associated health services, NHS services and Health Protection Teams. It builds on earlier advice on how to promote high levels of vaccination uptake amongst students in order to minimise the risk to them and their fellow students and to ensure that a protocol is in place that can be followed if a case occurs.​

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