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Our work in parliament – overview

Universities UK works on behalf of its members to maintain strong relationships with political parties in parliament and to influence policy change.

Our work includes:

  • lobbying to make sure that government and party policies are beneficial for universities

  • maintaining good contacts with key MPs, peers, advisers and researchers

  • submitt​ing written evidence to select committees

  • producing briefings for MPs to inform debates in both Houses

  • hosting regular and timely events to update parliamentarians on key higher education issues

We also support our members by briefing them ahead of meetings with parliamentarians and advise on opportunities to speak directly to MPs on issues that concern them.

Our current priorities include:

Universities UK also provides the secretariat for the All-Party Parliamentary University Group.​

Blogs

What next for the Teaching Excellence Framework?

3 February 2017
William Hammonds, Programme Manager at Universities UK, outlines the current challenges surrounding the Teaching Excellence Framework.

The industrial strategy and universities

23 January 2017
Julie Tam, Assistant Director of Policy at Universities UK, outlines the opportunities for universities in relation to the new industrial strategy.

News

Response to Lords Higher Education Bill vote

10 January 2017
Universities UK response to the vote on the Higher Education and Research Bill in the House of Lords committee stage

Universities UK response to government Teaching Excellence Framework plans

29 September 2016
Government has published details today of how universities will be rated under the second year of the Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF).

Response to Prime Minister’s education and tuition fees proposals

9 September 2016
Universities UK response to education reforms announced by the Prime Minister Theresa May. The proposals include plans that would require universities in England wanting to charge annual tuition fees of £6,000 or more to sponsor a school.